How I Quit My Job And Put $3000 Back In My Budget

At the end of 2013, I handed in my notice for my full-time management position and walked away from traditional employment forever. It was not an easy decision to make and I did struggle with it for many years before I actually took the plunge and did it.

Luckily, my husband was fully supportive of my decision and we were able to make the necessary adjustments to make this a reality for me. It was a huge sacrifice for both of us to give up the income of a well-paying, second job.

Here is the breakdown of how we put $3000 back into our budget every month:

 

($400) – Car Loan

($150) – Car Insurance

($400) – Gas For Car

($150) – Car Maintenance

($200) – Coffee/Eating Out At Work

($150) – Clothes For Work

($100) – Cable/Internet/Home Phone Bill

+$550 – Extra Overtime Hours From Husband

+$900 – Rental Income


 

If you are thinking about quitting your job, please read this post about the qualities you need to possess to successfully transition to non-employment first. If you still believe you have what it takes and think money is the only thing standing in your way, here is a breakdown of how to tackle your budget to help you get closer to handing in your final notice.

 

3 Tips To Help You Find Money In Your Budget

 

1. Eliminate expenses directly related to job employment

The first items that you need to look at in your budget are all of the expenses directly related to your job employment. These are the things that are incurred monthly in order for you to be employed. Examples are:

  • travel expenses (eg. car or commuter fees)
  • clothes (eg. business attire)
  • daily expenses (eg. coffees and lunches)
  • child care

The first 6 items on my chart above were incurred due to my job. By far, the largest expense was my car. I needed it to get to work. If I was not going to be working anymore, the car would be classified as a luxury and therefore had to go. We are now a one car family and believe me sometimes it is a huge pain in the ass but a sacrifice that I was willing to make in exchange for my freedom from the corporate world.

2. Other Expenses That Can Be Reduced

Next you have to look at all the items in your budget that are variable and that can be reduced or eliminated. Tackle things that are considered luxury or add-on items first. Examples are:

  • cable/internet
  • mobile phone
  • restaurants
  • gifts
  • clothing
  • entertainment

I have listed one example in my chart above as item #7. We reduced our cable/internet bill as well as eliminated the home phone all together.

3. Find Alternative Sources Of Income

Probably the most helpful tip on my list is this one. You have to be able to be open to alternative sources of income, especially at the beginning of your unemployment. Some of you are more than likely considering quitting your job to pursue a dream or build your own business. There are many things that you can do that can fill the gap in your income. Examples are:

  • rent a room in your house
  • contract yourself out
  • cleaning
  • babysitting
  • delivering papers/pizza

In the beginning, I probably did every one of those items on that list. I did deliver pizzas and clean a few houses to bring in some extra money. It really carried us through the lean times.

As well, you will notice item #9 on our list is rental income. We decided to rent out two rooms in our house. Though there is the inconvenience of more bodies and sometimes the hassle of being a landlord, this revenue stream has been extremely lucrative for us.

We were very fortunate that my husband was able to pick up extra shifts(item #8) at his job to help offset the loss of mine. Because we were both shift workers, we would rarely see each other when we both worked. My husband would turn down extra shifts because it was our day together. Now that I do not work, he is able to pick up extra hours whenever he is asked.

It has been a hard journey at times but I am so glad that I took the leap of faith and quit my job. Becoming a full-time blogger has been a very rewarding experience and I trust that you can see that it is possible to follow your dreams and change your life.

I hope my budget saving chart and 3 tips to find money in your budget can help you achieve your goal of retiring from traditional employment.

If you have any experiences with leaving full-time employment to pursue a dream, please share your successes with us in the comments.

I quit my job and put $3000 back in my budget. Use my 3 Tips to help you tackle your budget and get you closer to handing in your final notice.
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4 thoughts on “How I Quit My Job And Put $3000 Back In My Budget

  1. When we lost a large customer contract last year, I put my hand up to leave a very stressful corporate job at a company where I had worked for 29 years. While I worry about $$$, I have my mental health back and feel like I can breathe again. I am eternally grateful that my husband and I made the decision to “live within our means” a long time ago. We never did anything “big” until we could pay (i.e. renovations, travel), thought carefully about our purchases and said “no” alot to our kids. Frugal living has its rewards and honestly, as your article points outs, there are more elements that I should take a look at to see if there are additional savings to be had. Thanks!

    Like

  2. I quit my job after 18 yrs to pursue cosmetology school. I’m doing it for my retirement. I want to have my own home based salon. Only problem…no home and no start up money. The legal requirements for a home based salon are expensive…separate plumbing, bathroom and separate entrance just to name a few.
    But where there’s a will there’s a way!

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    1. That is right! Good for you for taking the steps towards your dream. You have made it this far, I am sure you will figure out the rest. Good Luck!

      Like

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