How To Start A Budget In Midlife For Retirement

Even if you have never, ever kept track of your money, you need to start a budget in midlife if you have any hopes of realizing the retirement you have dreamed of your entire life. And honestly, it doesn’t have to be complicated or mega restricting. All you have to do is prepare for and make adjustments BEFORE you work your last day. It is not too late. And I promise you, it is not as painful as it sounds.

This past week, my husband has been invited to a slew of retirement parties. But rest assured, it is not the last time that he will see his co-workers. You know why? Because after they retire, they almost always, sooner or later, come back as “casuals”. I am astonished at the number of people that retire with absolutely no plan in place on how they are going to manage their lower income. Once they figure out that they can no longer meet their financial obligations, they have to go back to work with their tails between their legs.

Unless you have a large sum of money sitting in your bank account, or have a pension that will equal your working income, you need to keep track of your current expenses and adjust them to suit your future reduced income. Failure to have a clear snapshot of your future financial position will ensure you having to struggle and/or have to supplement your income in retirement. So grab a coffee and a notebook and let’s get to work.

There are many apps and computer programs that can help you set a budget and track your expenses but I find doing it the old fashioned way, on paper, is the best way. You can always transfer your information to another method once you have all the numbers gathered.

 

Even if you have never, ever kept track of your money, you need to start a budget in midlife if you have any hopes of realizing the retirement you have dreamed of your entire life. And honestly, it doesn't have to be complicated or mega restricting. All you have to do is prepare for and make adjustments BEFORE you work your last day. It is not too late. And I promise you, it is not as painful as it sounds.

How To Start A Budget In Midlife For Retirement

Step #1 : Determine your monthly retirement income.

This may take some digging and research. My husband gets a statement at the end of every year that indicates what his retirement income will be when he retires. What income sources will you have? Gather all the information. Find out exactly how much your income will be from all sources and write that down on the top of your page. Write down the number of months till your retirement too.

Even if you have never, ever kept track of your money, you need to start a budget in midlife if you have any hopes of realizing the retirement you have dreamed of your entire life. And honestly, it doesn't have to be complicated or mega restricting. All you have to do is prepare for and make adjustments BEFORE you work your last day. It is not too late. And I promise you, it is not as painful as it sounds.

Step #2 : Log all of your current fixed monthly expenses.

This list should include your mortgage/rent, HOA fees, taxes, utilities, car payments, child/spousal support, insurance etc. Record the interest rates if applicable. Beside the expenses that have an end date, write down, in months, when you will no longer have that expense.

Even if you have never, ever kept track of your money, you need to start a budget in midlife if you have any hopes of realizing the retirement you have dreamed of your entire life. And honestly, it doesn't have to be complicated or mega restricting. All you have to do is prepare for and make adjustments BEFORE you work your last day. It is not too late. And I promise you, it is not as painful as it sounds.

Step #3 : Log all of your current flexible monthly expenses.

This list should include gas, groceries, cell phone, cable, internet, entertainment, eating out, beauty, vacations, clothing, gifts, household supplies, incidentals, etc. Not sure what you spend your money on? Grab 6 months of bank and credit card statements and record everything you spent your money on. Add up each expense and divide by 6. This should give you the average you spend monthly for that expense.

Even if you have never, ever kept track of your money, you need to start a budget in midlife if you have any hopes of realizing the retirement you have dreamed of your entire life. And honestly, it doesn't have to be complicated or mega restricting. All you have to do is prepare for and make adjustments BEFORE you work your last day. It is not too late. And I promise you, it is not as painful as it sounds.

Step #4 : Log all creditors, balances, interest rates, and minimum monthly payments.

This list should include all credit cards, lines of credit and outstanding loans not listed in Step #2. Calculate the number of months needed to pay off each debt making the minimum monthly payments.

Even if you have never, ever kept track of your money, you need to start a budget in midlife if you have any hopes of realizing the retirement you have dreamed of your entire life. And honestly, it doesn't have to be complicated or mega restricting. All you have to do is prepare for and make adjustments BEFORE you work your last day. It is not too late. And I promise you, it is not as painful as it sounds.

Step #5 : Subtract your total monthly expenses from your projected retirement income.

How you doing? Do you have a negative balance?

Even if you have never, ever kept track of your money, you need to start a budget in midlife if you have any hopes of realizing the retirement you have dreamed of your entire life. And honestly, it doesn't have to be complicated or mega restricting. All you have to do is prepare for and make adjustments BEFORE you work your last day. It is not too late. And I promise you, it is not as painful as it sounds.

Step #6 : Analyse your data, set goals and make an actionable plan to reduce expenses using your current income.

You should now have a clear snapshot of your future income and your current fixed and variable expenses. If you have a large negative balance from step 5, you have a lot of work to do. Fortunately you have your current income (which is hopefully higher than your retirement income) to help you widdle down and maybe even completely eliminate a large number of  your expenses before you reach retirement.

Even if you have never, ever kept track of your money, you need to start a budget in midlife if you have any hopes of realizing the retirement you have dreamed of your entire life. And honestly, it doesn't have to be complicated or mega restricting. All you have to do is prepare for and make adjustments BEFORE you work your last day. It is not too late. And I promise you, it is not as painful as it sounds.

Great goals to set:

  • Reduce retirement expenses.-Look at items on your list under steps 2 and 4. Look at the column that has the number of months left till zero balance and compare that to the number of months you have till retirement. Put an “X’ beside any item that will no longer be an expense once you retire. Now look at the expenses you have left. These are the categories that you want to budget in additional monies with your current income so that you can eliminate them before you retire. Your goal is to eliminate as many as possible.
  • Reduce, substitute and/or eliminate variable expenses.-These are on your list under step 3. This is where you can do some magic and get creative. If there are expenditures here that from this exercise you have found are way too high (example:eating out), now that you are aware of your over-spending, you can create a budget to reduce it.
  • Save and find more money to reach your goals by analysing interest rates.-If you have items on your list from steps 2 and 4 that have exceptionally high interest rates, it is a great idea to work on reducing these expenses first, regardless of whether the zero balance date happens before your retirement. If you eliminate high interest rate expenses, you will have more money to put towards other debt, thus accelerating this whole process.

Step #7 : Set up an emergency fund and a savings account.

Once your retire, you no longer have the chance to work overtime to cover surprises that come up. As you age, it is not unusual to have extra expenses crop up related to your health. (drugs, hospital stays, nursing care) You need to start putting away money for unforeseen expenses. Not having enough money for your essentials is very stressful. Don’t add that on to your plate. Open up a bank account that you can only access by walking into the bank. This prevents you from pulling out your debit card and using your savings account for purchases. Automatically transfer money to it every pay.

The above system is a very basic start to creating a budget. I did not want to overwhelm you with a whole bunch of steps and calculations. What I hope I have done is encouraged you to begin.

Click on the image below to download a FREE printable to help you record all of your information.

Even if you have never, ever kept track of your money, you need to start a budget in midlife if you have any hopes of realizing the retirement you have dreamed of your entire life. And honestly, it doesn't have to be complicated or mega restricting. All you have to do is prepare for and make adjustments BEFORE you work your last day. It is not too late. And I promise you, it is not as painful as it sounds.

The purpose of this exercise is to give you a good idea of where you are financially right now and where you will be in the future. If you can not answer questions like, how much do you spend on groceries every month, what is your total consumer debt, and what are the associated interest rates, then you need to complete the steps above and get working on a budget ASAP before you retire and have to live on a reduced income. A successful retirement depends on you knowing exactly where your money is going right now.

 

What have you done to ensure you don’t have to supplement your retirement income once you leave your job?

 


I would love to connect with you!
You can find me on PINTEREST, FACEBOOK, TWITTER, INSTAGRAM or Follow my blog with Bloglovin.

Join my support group for bloggers here. Join my Pinterest group board here.

Advertisements

15 thoughts on “How To Start A Budget In Midlife For Retirement

  1. The best intentions of mice and men. I should have never had to worry. Then came the recession, and I lost a lot of money through really no fault of my own–mostly.
    But I have a paid off house, no debt and some resources. I had always planned on writing for a living and at 50 in 2000 was fortunate enough to get a job as a reporter. i left it before the recession, and sat immobilized convinced I was going to spend my older age eating cat food. Then of course I realized that was exactly the wrong attitude. And because of the no debt and paid off house I had everything one needs.
    Now I’m motivated once more.
    ~pia

    Like

  2. Really great retirement and saving advice. Fortunately my husband and I are relatively debt free now. In the next 5-10 years we want to downsize our current home to something smaller or in a warmer climate 🙂

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s